Invasive Species Awareness Week

NISAW-logo09.jpg

National Invasive Species Awareness Week (NISAW) is a national effort to raise awareness and identify solutions to invasive species issues at local, state, tribal, regional, international, and national scales.

Invasive species have the potential to impact each and every one of us - threatening local agriculture, forests, fisheries, hydropower facilities & other industries, water delivery systems, outdoor recreation opportunities, and tourism - resulting in widespread economic and environmental harm. In addition to the Oregon Invasive Species Council (OISC), there are many agencies and organizations around the state that implement programs to protect our region from invasive species.

YOU can help protect the state from invasive species!


Here are some easy ways you can step up to the invasive species challenge:

 

Like to get out on the WATER?

Clean, drain and dry your boat, trailer and gear every time you leave a body of water.

 

stopaquatichitchhikers.org 

NISAW4.png
NISAW6.png
 

Invasive zebra and quagga mussels are more than annoying, they will attach to any hard surface and threaten hydropower facilities, water delivery, recreation, and lake ecosystems. YOU can prevent the spread of mussels simply by cleaning, draining, and drying your boat and equipment

Be sure to stop at inspection stations run by the Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife & purchase your invasive species permit from the Oregon State Marine Board.  These important efforts are to prevent a devastating introduction of zebra or quagga mussels into Oregon waterways.


 

Hopping on a HORSE soon?

Use forage, hay, or mulch that is certified as weed free and clean your horse & gear every time to avoid moving invasive plants or other unwanted hitchhikers.

Visit the North American Invasive Species Management Association to see details of its certification program.

 Horseback riders in BANDON, OREGON. ADOBE STOCK PHOTO.

Horseback riders in BANDON, OREGON. ADOBE STOCK PHOTO.


Can’t handle that PET anymore?

DO NOT release these plants or animals into the environment. They can become invasive very quickly and displace our native wildlife.

If you have a pet or fish you do not want, find a store, veterinary clinic, or rescue or contact the Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife

www.dontletitloose.com

 The “Red-eared slider” is a common pet turtle native to the Eastern U.S. that has devastating effects to our native turtle populations. Adobe Stock Photo.

The “Red-eared slider” is a common pet turtle native to the Eastern U.S. that has devastating effects to our native turtle populations. Adobe Stock Photo.

 Watch the video for the winner of the multimedia at the Watershed and Invasive Species Education Program Facebook page by clicking the picture Above. CREATED BY SANJANA POTNIS, NORTHWEST ACADAMY

Watch the video for the winner of the multimedia at the Watershed and Invasive Species Education Program Facebook page by clicking the picture Above. CREATED BY SANJANA POTNIS, NORTHWEST ACADAMY

 

Aquarium pets, like goldfish, can become invasive when released into the wild.  Think twice before you buy a pet and NEVER release pets into the wild.  It may be surprising to know that turtles can live a long time -- sometimes more than 20 years -- and those cute little turtles can grow to the size of a dinner plate quickly outgrowing your ability to care for the pet indoors. 


Planning a CAMPING trip?

Always use local firewood to avoid moving invasive wood boring pests, such as emerald ash borer (EAB), in from out of state.

DontMoveFirewood.org

 Toledo, OHio in 2006 -- Before Emerald Ash borer. hoto by Dan Hermes

Toledo, OHio in 2006 -- Before Emerald Ash borer.
hoto by Dan Hermes

 Toledo, OHio in 2009 -- After Emerald Ash borer. Photo by Dan Hermes

Toledo, OHio in 2009 -- After Emerald Ash borer.
Photo by Dan Hermes

 

Emerald ash borer has been named one of the most destructive forest pests in the U.S.  This small wood-boring insect has infested the Eastern U.S. and can travel into Oregon with untreated wood. If Emerald ash borer becomes established in Oregon, the impacts will be fast moving and dramatic -- killing off Ash trees that are common along streams and planted as street trees.


Love the OUTDOORS?

If you get outside to camp, hike, run, bike, bird, hunt  --- we do too! Make sure you clean your gear to avoid moving invasive plants, insects, and fungus.

www.playcleango.org

 

We have a lot to protect in the Pacific Northwest - clean drinking water, native fish, plants & wildlife, and diverse foods that support our way of life.  Do your best to protect Oregon from invasive species.


Got a green thumb for GARDENING?

Not all non-native plants are bad, but some plants that look lovely in your garden might be harmful invaders that will make their way into natural areas. Garden Smart Oregon has easy tips on help you make informed choices for your garden, water garden, and landscape.  

NISAW7.png
NISAW12.png
 

Invasive plants can easily escape your garden or pond without you knowing. Terrestrial weeds, like Gorse (above left) are often planted as a garden beauty, but can rapidly invade farms, pasture, and natural areas. Aquatic invasive plants, such as Water hyacinth (above right) can choke waterways impacting irrigation, habitat for fish, water quality, and water recreation.   


Are you an international TRAVELER?

Certain food and plant items are not allowed to enter the U.S. when you return from a trip because they may bring animal diseases or plant pests. Educate yourself about the risks associated with carrying certain types of food, plants, or other agricultural items in passenger baggage when traveling.

ALWAYS DECLARE food, plants and agricultural items.

 The larvae of high risk pest, Khapra beetle (left), can be found in rice, chickpeas, and safflower seeds in numerous countries in Africa, the Middle East, and Asia. Photo from California Department of Food and Agriculture. 

The larvae of high risk pest, Khapra beetle (left), can be found in rice, chickpeas, and safflower seeds in numerous countries in Africa, the Middle East, and Asia. Photo from California Department of Food and Agriculture. 

 Seed weevils from Tanzania infested a bag of beans (right) and was unknowingly brought into the U.S. Photo from the US Forest Service.

Seed weevils from Tanzania infested a bag of beans (right) and was unknowingly brought into the U.S. Photo from the US Forest Service.

Screen Shot 2018-02-22 at 3.58.17 PM.png

 

Learn more on the OISC Don’t Pack a Pest campaign page or visit DontPackaPest.com.


Planning a MOVE?

Don’t move pests with you.

Inspect your boxes and furniture for stow away insects, eggs, or plants and clean off all items before leaving - especially items that have been in storage or outside.

Understand the risks  - contact your local invasive species council to find out what you can do to avoid moving invasive species with you.

NISAW3.png
NISAW2.png

Have you seen an animal, plant or insect that looks out of place?

 Feral Pigs reproduce very quickly and have been shown to impact timber production, farm operations, and have been found to prey on young livestock.  They are destructive animals to the environment and can impact water quality among other serious impacts in a very short amount of time. Adobe stock photo.

Feral Pigs reproduce very quickly and have been shown to impact timber production, farm operations, and have been found to prey on young livestock.  They are destructive animals to the environment and can impact water quality among other serious impacts in a very short amount of time. Adobe stock photo.

 Emerald ash borer are known to leave d-shaped exit holes when exiting through the bark of trees.  it is critical that we detect this invasive pest as soon as possible if it enters the state.  You can be trained to detect forest pests through the Oregon Forest Pest Detectors Program. Photo: Woodworker’s Journal, 2015

Emerald ash borer are known to leave d-shaped exit holes when exiting through the bark of trees.  it is critical that we detect this invasive pest as soon as possible if it enters the state.  You can be trained to detect forest pests through the Oregon Forest Pest Detectors Program. Photo: Woodworker’s Journal, 2015

Always report invasive species! Bookmark the mobile-friendly site: https://oregoninvasiveshotline.org/ to report anything you see that might be invasive or call the hotline number: 1-866-INVADER

NISAW18.png

To report a feral pig, you can alert officials through the Squeal on Pigs hotline: 888-268-9219

NISAW14.png

Want to stay CONNECTED?

 Stay up to date on invasive species issues, Follow the Oregon Invasive Species Council on Social Media on Facebook and Twitter. 

 
 

Interested in Participating in Local NISAW Efforts?

  • Volunteer at one of the many opportunities we have listed on the OISC Events Page
  • Spread the word about invasive species on social media -- "Attend" & share our virtual event on Facebook -- Don’t forget to tag us on Facebook (@OregonISC) and Twitter (@OISCouncil)

  • Contact us directly to send us event details or photos for us to share online. We would love to share images of the invasive species that are a priority for you and the work you are doing to combat the issue

  • Learn more about upcoming NISAW events by visiting www.nisaw.org


IF YOU LIVE, WORK OR PLAY IN WASHINGTON, check out what our partner to the north is up to!

WISC Color Copier.jpg

For more information about the Washington Invasive Species Council, visit invasivespecies.wa.gov or follow them on social media: