OISC Accomplishments 

The Oregon Invasive Species Council provides the means for multi-agency communication and collaboration to meet the state's goals. Notable activities and achievements are categorized under the responsibilities of the Council, as set forth in ORS 570.755. These include: Maintaining an invasive species reporting hotline, Educating the public about invasive species, Developing a statewide plan for invasive species, and Providing a grant or loan program for eradication of invasive species. Also included below are some highlights of collaboration from our national, regional, tribal, state, and local partners to prevent the introduction of invasive species and to eradicate, contain, or manage existing invasive species in Oregon.


2018

View the 2018 Oregon Invasive Species Council Members

Educated the public about invasive species

  • Launched Social Media Campaign during National Invasive Species Awareness Week (NISAW)

Conducted educational meetings and conferences

  • Hosted 2-day Winter 2018 OISC meeting in Salem, OR 

  • Presented at Tree School 2018 in Clackamas County, OR

  • Presented at CONNECT 2018 in Seaside, OR

  • Presented at State of the State 2018: Forest Health in Oregon in Corvallis, OR

  • Co-organized (with Washington Invasive Species Council) a special session on invasive species at the Oregon/Washington Chapters of The Wildlife Society, Partners for Reptile and Amphibian Conservation, Society for Northwest Vertebrate Biology Meeting

  • Presented at the Government to Government: Natural Resources Working Group Meeting

Highlights of Collaboration

  • EMERALD ASH BORER: The Oregon Department of Forestry and the Oregon Department of Agriculture have led the effort to create an Emerald Ash Borer Readiness & Response Plan for Oregon. In total, 7 meetings were held over a 12-month period, including a collaborative meeting for the Emerald Ash Borer Advisory Committee that had over 45 attendees.

    • Collaboration between: Oregon Department of Forestry, Oregon Department of Agriculture, US Forest Service, Portland Parks and Recreation, Oregon State University Extension, USDA APHIS-PPQ 

    • OISC Role: Share information and resources at meetings, support regional networks, communication, and relationship building to strengthen coordinated efforts


2016-2017

View/download the 2016-2017 OISC Accomplishments Summary PDF 

View/download the 2016-2017 Council Member Insert

Maintained invasive species reporting hotlines

  • The OISC Invasives Hotline gathered over 2,000 reports of suspected invasive plants and insects as of October 2017

  • The Squeal on Pigs Hotline for reporting feral pigs

  • OISC website dedicated to educating citizens about the importance of invasive species and providing resources for education and involvement in managing and eradicating invasive species

Educated the public about invasive species

  • Expanded partnerships with Cooperative Weed Management Areas, Oregon State Extension, neighboring invasive species councils in U.S. and Canada, Pacific Northwest Economic Region Invasive Species

  • Created new outreach materials: OISC outreach brochure, tabling materials, and website

  • Supported public engagement events with partners including Washington Invasive Species Council, Oregon Vegetation Management Association, and OMSI

  • Supported the expansion of the Don’t Pack a Pest campaign

  • Updated Council publications, including “Top Invaders” list

Conducted educational meetings and conferences

  • Facilitated the 2016 OISC Summit – “Protecting Oregon from Invasive Species: The Path Forward,” which had 80 attendees in total

  • Engaged with more than 300 people from across the state about invasive species issues, including 7 Council meetings in Astoria, Hermiston, Clackamas, Salem (2), Bend, and Portland

  • Hosted 2016 awards for invasive species leaders in the state

  • Participated in working group meetings as a way to network and share information across taxa through venues like The Wildlife Society, the Garlic Mustard Working Group, and Cooperative Weed Management Area events

  • Council members and agency representatives participated in professional societies such as: Oregon Chapter of the American Fisheries Society, Oregon Lakes Association, Washington State Lake Protection Association, The Western Regional Panel on Aquatic Nuisance Species, Columbia Basin Team 100th Meridian Initiative, tribal organizations

Developed a statewide plan for invasive species

  • Developed and published the Oregon Statewide Strategic Plan for Invasive Species and Action Plan

  • Supported the development of Oregon’s emerald ash borer readiness and response plan

Provided a grant/loan program for eradication of invasive species

  • Distributed $231,000 in emergency funding from Invasive Species Emergency Control account for Sudden oak death EU1 strain and Japanese beetle eradication efforts

Highlights of Collaboration

  • BOAT INSPECTION STATIONS: In 2016, 16,825 watercraft were inspected. 391 intercepted watercraft were contaminated with aquatic invasive species (17 with Quagga or zebra mussels) and decontaminated. In 2017, 21,026 watercraft were inspected, of which 299 watercraft were contaminated with aquatic invasive species (16 with Quagga or zebra mussels) & decontaminated.

    • Collaboration between: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Oregon State Marine Board, Jackson County, Klamath County, Malhuer County, Oregon State Police, Oregon Tourism, Oregon Department of Transportation, Oregon State Parks, Army Corps of Engineers,Bureau of Reclamation, Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, Western Regional Panel, Pacific Northwest Economic Region

    • OISC Role: Share information and resources at meetings, support regional networks, communication, and relationship building to strengthen coordinated efforts

  • GYPSY MOTH TRAPPING PROGRAM: ODA trapped two Asian gypsy moths near Port of Portland in 2015. Treatment demanded a multi-agency effort in 2016. ODF and ODA worked together to implement the treatment strategy and the project was a success. Gypsy moths were not detected in follow-up traps.

    • Collaboration between: Oregon Department of Agriculture, Oregon Department of Forestry, USDA APHIS PPQ, Customs and Border Protection, Port of Portland, US Forest Service, Portland Parks and Recreation, Oregon State University Extension & Oregon Forest Pest Detectors Program. Many additional partners supported the 2016 rapid response, including: public health organizations, SWCDs, neighborhood, community, and homeowners associations, and non-profit advocacy groups

    • OISC Role: Facilitate information and resource sharing, support community engagement and communication through a website, materials, community engagement strategy and event facilitation

  • SQUEAL ON PIGS CALLER HOTLINE: Feral swine greatly disturb soils, farmland and natural areas. Swine reproduce quickly and can spread diseases to humans. Dedicated eradication efforts in central Oregon have greatly reduced feral swine populations to approximately 200-500. Oregon, Washington and Idaho depend on this hotline for feral swine sightings.

    • Collaboration between: USDA APHIS Wildlife Services, Wasco County Soil & Water Conservation District, Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife, County Governments, Washington State, Idaho State, private landowners in Central Oregon, Bureau of Land Management, Trout Creek Restoration Project

    • OISC Role: Manage statewide Squeal on Pigs hotline for reporting feral swine sightings and disturbances, support communication to leverage resources & collaboration

  • EDUCATIONAL OUTREACH CAMPAIGN: The Don’t Pack A Pest Program educates travelers about the risks associated with carrying certain types of food, plants, or other agricultural items in passenger baggage. Since 2015, multiple state and federal agencies in Oregon have worked cooperatively to evaluate and expand the Don’t Pack a Pest message reaching dozens of new partners and thousands of students.

    • Collaboration between: United States Department of Agriculture, Oregon Department of Agriculture, Port of Portland, California Department of Food and Agriculture, Customs and Border Protection, USDA APHIS-PPQ, Oregon State University, Oregon Sea Grant, International Student Program Administrators and Students, Northern Oregon International Educators, NAFSA

    • OISC Role: Create printed and digital outreach materials, facilitate information and resource sharing, support regional network connections, and build relationships to strengthen coordinated efforts

  • STATEWIDE STRATEGIC PLAN: The Statewide Strategic Plan serves as a roadmap for planning, strategies and recommended actions for the state to protect Oregon’s resources and economies from invasive species.

    • Collaboration between: Council members & their agency leadership, council committees, and invasive species professionals from around the state

    • OISC Role: Coordinated the development of the strategic plan by organizing and spearheading outreach efforts to various stakeholders, continue to connect with regional leaders to align plans across the state & provinces, and coordinate implementation

  • JAPANESE BEETLE ERADICATION: Japanese beetle eradication in Washington County. Japanese beetle was first detected in Oregon in 2016 and if established, could cost the state an estimated $45.5 million annually in forestry and agriculture losses. In 2017, Oregon Department of Agriculture coordinated the first of a multi-year eradication effort with local, state and federal partners. 

    • Collaboration between: Oregon Department of Agriculture, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, Metro, Washington County, and many other supporting organizations

    • OISC Role: Provided $150,000 in emergency funding for a Japanese beetle eradication project in 2017

  • OREGON FOREST PEST DETECTOR PROGRAM AND EAB READINESS & RESPONSE PLAN: Invasive insect pests are a threat to Oregon’s forests and natural resources. The Oregon Forest Pest Detector Program is a collaborative training program developed by Oregon State University Extension and Oregon Department of Forestry with other local, state and federal partners to detect invasive pests such as Emerald ash borer, Asian longhorned beetle, and Asian gypsy moth. Additionally, partners began developing a statewide Readiness and Response plan for the state of Oregon in 2017.

    • Collaboration between: Oregon State University Extension, Oregon Department of Forestry, and many other local, state, and federal partners

    • OISC Role: Facilitate information and resource sharing, support community engagement and communication through a website, social media, educational materials, and community engagement strategy

  • COOPERATIVE WEST COAST BALLAST WATER MANAGEMENT: Oregon Department of Environmental Quality’s Ballast Water Management Program coordinates between international, federal, and state agencies along the West Coast to align regulations and works alongside commercial shipping and port industries to decrease the likelihood of zebra mussel and other aquatic invasions.

    • Collaboration between: Oregon Department of Environmental Quality and international, federal, and state agencies along the West Coast

    • OISC Role: Facilitate information and resource sharing, support regional network connections, and build relationships to strengthen coordinated efforts

  • OREGON AQUATIC NUISANCE SPECIES MANAGEMENT PLAN & MONITORING EFFORTS: In addition to The Oregon State Marine Board and Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife agency-led boat inspection program, they also work closely with partners -- including Portland State University’s Center for Lakes and Reservoirs and US Geological Survey among others -- to monitor water bodies around the state to keep Oregon’s waters free of new aquatic invasive species and limit the spread of existing species. The Oregon Aquatic Nuisance Species Management Plan is managed by Portland State University in cooperation with local, state, and federal agencies with funding from the US Fish & Wildlife Service.
    • Collaboration between: Oregon State Marine Board, Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife, Portland State University’s Center for Lakes and Reservoirs, US Geological Survey, US Fish & Wildlife Service

    • OISC Role: Facilitate information and resource sharing, support regional network connections, and build relationships to strengthen coordinated efforts


2014-2015

Maintained invasive species reporting hotlines

  • Web-based hotline was upgraded to be faster and easier to use on mobile devices and includes a GPS locator

  • Supported the OISC Invasives Hotline and the Squeal on Pigs Hotline

Educated the public about invasive species

  • “Top 100 Worst Invaders” & Oregon’s Report Card for 2014

  • Don’t Let it Loose- high school media contest for students and teachers in Oregon

Conducted educational meetings and conferences

  • Convened four Council meetings in Salem, Portland, and Roseburg

  • Hosted annual awards for invasive species leaders in the state

Developed a statewide plan for invasive species

  • The OISC began the planning process in September 2015 to develop a combined statewide strategic plan and action plan with the following five objectives: Prevention, Early Detection & Rapid Response, Control & Management, Education & Outreach, and Coordination & Leadership

Provided a grant/loan program for eradication of invasive species

  • Distributed funding from Invasive Species Emergency Control account for tunicate monitoring

Highlights of Collaboration

  • FLOWERING RUSH: Flowering rush was detected in Oregon in 2014, leading to a subsequent rapid response in coordination with state and federal partners and recent development of a Columbia Basin-wide, coordinated management strategy
  • DON'T PACK A PEST: Phase I of Don’t Pack a Pest campaign in partnership with Oregon Department of Agriculture, Oregon State University and other state/national partners

  • OISC COORDINATOR: Hired a new OISC coordinator team, Samara Group


Previous OISC Accomplishments

2012

The Council produced an updated “Oregon Invasive Species Council Action Plan” for 2012 – 2016. This document included a four-year action plan for council-specific activities and five goals: coordination/cooperation, funding, policy, public awareness and outreach, and research and monitoring.

2010

The Council produced the “Statewide Management Assessment of Invasive Species in Oregon.” This Assessment report provided a detailed description of the state of invasive species in Oregon, including economic implications, and it included survey results from stakeholders across the state, and twelve prioritized recommendations for the Council to enhance invasive species management efforts in the state.

2005

The Council developed the “Oregon Invasive Species Action Plan.” The first of its kind for Oregon, this plan described Council members’ roles and responsibilities for the state and identified the top 100 most dangerous invaders threatening Oregon.

2001

Oregon Invasive Species Council (OISC) formed by the Oregon Legislature

1999

National Invasive Species Council established by Executive Order (EO) 13112